sticky

Search Off The Corner

Friday, April 4, 2014

100 Greatest Old School Hip Hop Records From 1979 to 1985

100 Greatest Old School Hip Hop Records From 1979 to 1985

 Rap music has always existed as an element of Hip Hop since the culture's birth in the early 1970s. The first rappers (called MCs) would rap over funk, reggae, dub, soul, and disco beats and would hold spontaneous rhyming battles that were meant to verbally attack an opponent called "freestyles" (freestyling and flowing were words used to describe the impromptu vocal delivery). Artists that laid the template for such aggressive spoken word set to a funky beat include James Brown, Gil Scott-Heron, The Watts Prophets, and The Last Poets. 

By the spring of 1979, the first rap record surfaced with funk band The Fatback Band's "King Tim IIII (Personality Jock)". Later, The Sugar Hill Gang debuted in the summer with Hip Hop's most famous commercial record yet,"Rapper's Delight". This list targets critical Hip Hop records during the old school era (1979-roughly 1985) before the revolution of "cut-n-paste" music and Run DMC's seminal Hip Hop anthem "Walk This Way" in 1986. 

REMEMBER: 
Hip Hop is first and foremost a culture with five important elements: the b-boys (break dancers), Graffiti/Aerosol artists, MCs, DJs, and the beatboxers. Knowledge and understanding and respect for Hip Hop and its roots are vital.

Monday, September 30, 2013

Iconic New York hip-hop film, 'Wild Style,' celebrated on 30th anniversary


Director Charlie Ahearn's tale of a graffiti artist's quest is a snapshot to a former age - and gets its due with a 2013 screening.


Thirty years ago, of course, New York had a whole different energy.
The opportunity to experience that era again is merely one reason "Wild Style," the 1983 hip-hop verite-drama celebrating its 30th anniversary this week at IFC, is a must-see.
"It was a portrait of people I thought were spearheading a whole new movement that was going on," says "Wild Style" director Charlie Ahearn.
"These guys in the Bronx had developed hip-hop into a language. It was like making a big art movie populated by all these creative individuals."
The film holds a place in history for being the first representation on film of New York's hip-hop scene. In it, a graffiti artist named Raymond (Lee Quinones) who, under the pseudonym "Zoro," traverses the city - especially the South Bronx - spray-paining subway cars (stationary targets are too easy for him).
He avoids the cops, romances a girl (Sandra Fabara) and hits big when he tags the background for a major "underground" rap competition outside an abandoned downtown theater.
Among the famous faces in the film are Fab 5 Freddy, Grandmaster Flash and Busy Bee.



The IFC Center is located at 323 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10014 For tickets and information go to www.ifccenter.com or call 212-924-7771


RECENT ARTICLES

Popular Articles